Monday July 22nd, 2024
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Emaar Properties Unveils First 3D Printed Villa in Dubai

With a car park, three bedrooms, and four bathrooms, the house aims to shape the future of construction.

Rana Gabr

In alignment with Dubai’s Smart City vision, Emaar Properties, a global property developer, collaborated with COBOD, a leading supplier of 3D printers in the construction sector, and Xiaomi, a consumer electronics and smart manufacturing company, to design and 3D print a villa originally conceived by Dubai-based architecture firm U+A. 

This project marks Emaar's first foray into construction with 3D printing. Emaar states that additive manufacturing enables faster, more cost-effective construction and allows for more distinctive designs.

The project was first announced in 2019, and was delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the company has  released the first images of the 202 m2 (2,175 SF) 3D printed home, which includes an integrated car park, three bedrooms, and four bathrooms. 

The interior spaces are complemented by a fully equipped kitchen, dining room, and study. The 3D-printed house integrates Xiaomi’s MobileX AIoT products, combining Artificial Intelligence with the Internet of Things to enhance operational efficiency and improve human-machine interaction. These include smart vacuum cleaners, air purifiers, and cameras. 

The extensive use of curved walls and large-scale windows are notable design features lending a distinctive character to the structure. 

Furthermore, 3D printing methods reduce waste and minimise noise pollution during construction. COBOD's 3D printers have been instrumental in erecting one  to three-story structures across all six inhabited continents. One of which is the first on-site 3D printed water tanks constructed in Kuwait.

The Dubai villa has been constructed using COBOD’s BOD2 3D printer. A gantry based 3D printer optimised for on-site large-format concrete 3D printing, the BOD2 weighs 5390 kg and operates at a sound level of less than 70 dB.

This 3D printer has already been used in construction projects around the world. For instance, back in 2020 the BOD2 was leveraged by Germany-based construction company PERI Group to construct a 3D printed three-floor commercial apartment building in Wallenhausen, Germany.

Photography Credit: EMAAR

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